An Arbor Embolism? Why Trees Die In Drought

Posted by Robyn, January 16, 2013

Scientists who study forests say they’ve discovered something disturbing about the way prolonged drought affects trees.

It has to do with the way trees drink. They don’t do it the way we do — they suck water up from the ground all the way to their leaves, through a bundle of channels in a part of the trunk called the xylem. The bundles are like blood vessels.

When drought dries out the soil, a tree has to suck harder. And that can actually be dangerous, because sucking harder increases the risk of drawing air bubbles into the tree’s plumbing.

Plant scientist Brendan Choat explains: “As drought stress increases, you have more and more gas accumulating in the plumbing system, until they can’t get any water up into the leaves. This is really bad news for the plant because this is like having an embolism in a human blood vessel.”

via NPR.org » An Arbor Embolism? Why Trees Die In Drought.

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