Agriculture

Donald Trump Is ‘Honoring’ The Outdoors With Policies To Ruin It

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump proclaimed the month of June to be both Great Outdoors Month and National Ocean Month, an annual practice that often encourages Americans to relish in the country’s natural beauty. Former President George W. Bush first proclaimed both in 2004 and 2007, respectively, and the tradition has been carried on.
In 2008, […]

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Study Links Childhood Cancer and In-Home Pesticide Use

WASHINGTON – A new study by Harvard researchers provides disturbing evidence that children’s exposure to household insecticides is linked to higher risks of childhood leukemia and lymphoma, the most common cancers in children. The analysis also found an association between use of outdoor herbicides to lawns and gardens and higher risks of leukemia… “It is […]

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Doubts About The Promised Bounty Of Genetically Modified Crops

LONDON — The controversy over genetically modified crops has long focused on largely unsubstantiated fears that they are unsafe to eat… But an extensive examination by The New York Times indicates that the debate has missed a more basic problem — genetic modification in the United States and Canada has not accelerated increases in crop […]

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A Sustainable Food System Could Be A Trillion-Dollar Global Windfall

The (flagship report) claims that taking a sustainable approach to the world’s food and agriculture challenges, like hunger, food waste and environmental degradation, could lead to new business opportunities totaling an annual $2.3 trillion — and 80 million new jobs — by 2030, based on an analysis of of industry reports and academic literature… That […]

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Monsanto profits from chemical agriculture

Janine Jackson interview Patty Lovera of Food and Water Watch on Monsanto:
Monsanto at this point has become synonymous, not just with GMOs, but I think also with a type of agriculture, and it’s a type of agriculture that’s really counter to the way a lot of people want to farm around the world, and are […]

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Plant gene: another view

Pamela Ronald , Professor of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, writes in The Conversation:
New molecular tools are blurring the distinction between genetic improvements made with conventional breeding and those made with modern genetic methods. One example is marker assisted breeding, in which geneticists identify genes or chromosomal regions associated with traits desired by farmers […]

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Restoring the Everglades will benefit both humans and nature

Restoring the Everglades will benefit both humans and nature
The park and the wider Everglades ecosystem have suffered immense ecological damage from years of overdrainage to prevent flooding and promote development.
via Restoring the Everglades will benefit both humans and nature.

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Bill Gates goes for chickens

After thinking it over, Bill Gates realizes that Chickens are an answer to poverty.
He elaborates on the subject in this LinkedIn Pulse story.
I hope he isn’t using the chickens he is pictured with. They won’t do the job for him. They are commercial Leghorns and hybrids. They can’t reproduce themselves, since they are already cross […]

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Can A Tiny Wasp Help Save The Citrus Industry?

Researchers in Arizona are fighting fire with fire. They’re collecting new data on a wasp that may help slow the spread of citrus greening, a plant disease that has devastated millions of acres of citrus crops, particularly in Florida.
 
http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/05/18/478408570/can-a-tiny-wasp-save-the-citrus-industry

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California’s colorful despite drought

Sara Aminzadeh calls it out for Popular Resistance:
As the drought continues, Californians are stepping up to conserve water, and collectively exceeded Gov. Brown’s 25 percent reduction mandate in June 2015. Nonetheless, water-intensive lawns and other hallmarks of an English garden-style landscape still remain a huge draw on our state’s dwindling water supply.

Outdoor watering accounts for about half of residential […]

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Starbucks Is Selling Nearly A Half-Billion Dollars In ‘Sustainability’ Bonds

The coffee giant is asking investors to fund its environmental efforts for the first time.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/starbucks-sustainability-bonds_us_5735e64fe4b077d4d6f2d612

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CO2 levels add to bees’ woes

How Rising CO2 Levels May
Contribute to Die-Off of Bees
As they investigate the factors behind the decline of bee populations, scientists are now eyeing a new culprit — soaring levels of carbon dioxide, which alter plant physiology and significantly reduce protein in important sources of pollen.
by Lisa Palmer
Specimens of goldenrod sewn into archival paper folders […]

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What’s happening to the bees?

This article was originally published by Global Research in March 2014
Scientists have recently reported that mass extinctions of marine animals may soon be occurring at alarmingly rapid rates than previously projected due to pollution, rising water temperatures and loss of habitat. Many land species also face a similar fate for the same reasons. But perhaps the biggest […]

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America’s impact on Cuba’s agriculture

The Conversation reports on a potential downside:
President Obama’s trip to Cuba this week accelerated the warming of U.S.-Cuban relations. Many people in both countries believe that normalizing relations will spur investment that can help Cuba develop its economy and improve life for its citizens.
But in agriculture, U.S. investment could cause harm instead.
For the past 35 […]

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New rules limit livestock antibiotics

The Greely Tribune reports:
When the Veterinary Feed Directive goes into effect in 2017, it will impact nearly everyone in the livestock industry.
But at the Colorado Farm Show this week, when Christine Gabel, territory business manager with animal health company Zoetis asked a room of farmers and ranchers if they’d heard of it, she was met […]

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Consumers and climate change

EurekaAlert writes about the carbon footprint of production:
The world’s workshop — China — surpassed the United States as the largest emitter of greenhouse gases on Earth in 2007. But if you consider that nearly all of the products that China produces, from iPhones to tee-shirts, are exported to the rest of the world, the picture […]

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Cover crops restore soil

The NY Times takes a look at cover crops in agriculture:
Cover cropping is still used only by a small minority of farmers. When the Agriculture Department asked for the first time about cover cropping for its 2012 Census of Agriculture report, just 10.3 million acres — out of about 390 million total acres of farmland […]

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Pastured eggs score with consumers

NYTimes reports:
CRESCENT CITY, Calif. — A decade ago, a couple running a dairy business in Northern California visited a Mennonite farm where the owner had used a flock of laying hens to teach his children business principles and instill values like responsibility and care for nature.
They returned home and bought 150 hens for their boys, […]

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Unattractive fruit finds appreciation

The NYTimes reports:
EMERYVILLE, Calif. — The eggplants are crooked and a little long-necked, contorted enough that they would probably lose in a beauty pageant against rounder or more symmetrical aubergines.
In the field where they were grown or in the supermarkets for which they were once destined, they would presumably have been discarded. Not because they […]

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EPA revokes toxic herbicide approval

The NYTimes reports:
The Environmental Protection Agency, in a surprising move, has decided to revoke the approval of a herbicide that was made to be used on a new generation of genetically modified crops.
The agency’s decision could delay the introduction of corn, soybeans and cotton developed by Dow Chemical to be resistant to the herbicide 2,4-D. […]

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